Recipe for Nursing Colds/Flu

By Vicky Chan of NourishU

This winter has been a worse-than-average flu season and many people have been infected. The Western medicine approach of using antibiotics to fight the cold and flu virus is “over-prescribing” because the success rate has only been around 20%. The overuse of antibiotics has caused many experts to project an imminent “antibiotic apocalypse”.

On average, adults can get two to four colds per year and kids can get as many as six to eight. This is why the ailment is called the COMMON cold/flu. Normally by treating it with enough rest and proper dietary care, the body will be able to recover within days if not a week, without having to use drugs. Usually, it is only people in poor health that can develop serious symptoms and complications that can result in death in extreme cases.

Chinese Medicine knows a lot about the common cold/flu. The renowned classic textbook called The Theory of Febrile Disease describes the different stages and manifestations of the illness. It gives a detailed explanation on what and how to use proper dietary care to speed up recovery and to prevent the illness from going deeper into the body. The key to dietary care is to know what not to eat and what to eat, and to stick to it.

For wind-cold type of conformation, it is crucial not to eat cold foods (temperature wise as well as foods that are cold in nature). This includes cold drinks and foods, fresh fruits and raw vegetables, and cooling foods and herbs. Eat only hot and warming foods and drinks. The common condiments found in most kitchens such as ginger, garlic, scallions, vinegar, pepper, chili and onion are all effective in helping the body to raise its internal temperature to drive out coldness and to kill bacteria and viruses. They are tried-and-true remedies and are suitable for most people. We just need to be mindful to not take more than our stomach can handle especially hot spices and vinegar.

For wind-heat type of conformation, using foods that have a cooling nature such as tofu, daikon, Chinese pears, mung beans, water chestnut, chrysanthemum tea and bok-choy are highly recommended.

In all cases, deep-fried foods and hard to digest foods are restricted because they are more work for the body to digest when it needs all its energy to heal. Plain, easy to digest, fluid and semi-fluid foods such as soup and congee are most suitable. Nutrient dense foods, warming and enriching foods and herbs are to be avoided because they can intensify the virus and prolong the suffering.

Here is a recipe which is most suitable for treating influenza and coughing with phlegm. Take it as many times as needed until most symptoms are gone. Please also refer to our website www.nourishu.com for many other related recipes.

Snow-Ear Mushroom, Fritillariae and Pear Soup

SYMPTOMS

Cold and flu with cough, chronic dry cough, weakened lung function with lack of energy and difficulty breathing.

THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS

Treats cold/flu with sore throat and headache, nourishes lungs, clears heat in the lungs, clears phlegm, astringes cough and promotes vital fluids.

Recipe1

INGREDIENTS

Fritillariae Cirrhosae (chuan bei mu) 川貝母 – 5 grams

Snow-Ear Mushroom – 20 grams

Chinese Pear – one

Honey – to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Crush chuan bei into powder.

2. Rinse and soak mushroom for 30 minutes. Cut out bottom brown stem and separate into smaller pieces.

3. Skin pear, cut into halves and hollow out seeds in the centre.

4. Put chuan bei powder in the center of pear and put pear in a casserole.

5. Add mushroom and enough water to cover the pear (about 1.5 cups). Add honey to taste (about 2 spoonfuls) and cover casserole with lid.

6. Use a slightly bigger pot with water and a stand at the bottom to steam the casserole for about an hour. Add hot water regularly to the cooking to prevent drying.

7. Serve warm and be sure to eat it all for full therapeutic effect.

recipe2

USAGE

To be taken once a day on an empty stomach. This recipe is suitable for all ages.


The Common Cold - Causes and Food Therapy in Chinese Medicine

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

How many of us, with the coming of winter and colder weather, succumb to the common cold? Sore throat, stuffy nose, fever and chills are all symptoms that accompany a cold, and ones most of us have come to know so well.

In Chinese medicine, the common cold is seen to be caused by external pathogens invading the body. There are several kinds of external pathogenic factors leading to the common cold. The first is wind-cold, the second is wind-heat and the third is summer-heat and dampness. Remember, if your immune system is depressed or under stress then your defences are less able to fight off a cold or any pathogenic factors.

The common cold occurs at any time of year, but is most common in winter and spring. The incubation period for a cold is about one day. Symptoms usually begin around the nose and throat, with a stuffy nose, sore throat or sneezing, and sometimes there may be a slight fever. Here is how, in Chinese medicine, you can tell what kind of cold you have and below are some simple Chinese herbal recipes to help relieve symptoms and help you get over your cold more quickly.

 

Wind-Cold Common Cold

The symptoms of a wind-cold invasion are:

~ strong aversion to cold

~ slight fever without sweating

~ headache

~ stuffy nose

~ watery nasal discharge

~ cough

~ expectoration of thin, white sputum

~ thirst with a desire for hot drinks

~ pain in the limbs

 

Wind-Heat Common Cold

The symptoms of an invasion of wind-heat are:

~ high fever

~ slight aversion to wind

~ distending pain in the head

~ a little sweating

~ sore throat

~ stuffy nose

~ thick yellow nasal discharge

~ cough with sticky yellow phlegm

~ thirst with a strong desire to drink

 

Summer-Heat and Dampness Common Cold

The symptoms of a summer-heat with dampness type cold are:

~ fever

~slight aversion to wind

~ heavy and distending pain in the head

~ aching pain in the limbs

~ thirst but little or no desire to drink

~ chest oppression

~ loss of appetite

~ nausea

~ yellow or cloudy urine

Food Therapy Recipes for the Common Cold

Wind-Heat Common Cold Recipe

Peppermint Porridge (Congee)

Step 1

1. Take 30g (1 oz) of fresh peppermint, or 15g (1/2 oz) of dried peppermint.

2. Add 2 cups of boiling water to fresh or dried peppermint

3. Cover and allow to steep for 5 minutes

4. Strain and save the liquid to add to step 2

Step 2

5. Take 90g (3oz) round grain rice, 3 cups of water and 1 tsp of honey

6. Bring rice and water to a boil, then allow to simmer for 30 minutes

7. When the rice is cooked, add the peppermint tea and teaspoon of honey

8. Stir and allow to boil for 5 minutes

9. Divide porridge into 2 servings and take on in the morning and the other in the evening.

 

Wind-Cold Common Cold Recipe

Ginger Rice Soup

1. Take 10g (5 slices) of fresh ginger, 100g (3 1/2 oz) polished round grain rice or glutinous rice and 30g (2 pieces) green onion

2. Cook the fresh ginger and rice in 4 cups of water for 30 minutes

3. Then add the green onion and simmer for 30 minutes

4. Eat the entire amount while it is still hot

5. After eating, lie in bed under a thick blanket to sweat out the cold that has entered the body. (This soup enduces sweating!)

Summer-Heat and Dampness Common Cold Recipe

Porridge of Job's Tears Seed & Hyacinth Bean

1. Take 30g (1oz) Job's-tears seed, 30g (1oz) white hyacinth bean, 100g (3 1/2oz) round grain rice

2. Bring all ingredients to a boil in 4 cups of water

3. After bringing to a boil, reduce to a simmer and allow to cook for 40 minutes

4. Separate porridge into 2 servings, and take one in the morning and the other in the evening.

There are several things we can do to prevent catching a cold. Things like dressing warmly (so wind doesn't get in), getting enough sleep to keep your immune system strong, staying hydrated, eating well and exercising are all important to staying healthy in the winter months and all year round. But, with our busy lifestyles, if you do happen to come down with a cold, resting, and using Chinese food therapy is a good way to get over your cold as quickly as possible.