Tapping and Slapping Qigong

By John Voigt

The Exercise

This qigong may be done when standing, seated, or walking. It is a delight to do in the morning, especially with others in a park as the morning sun rises. But it may be done at any time, and it’s especially helpful if you haven’t moved for a while. As with any exercise, and especially if you have or may have an illness, first check with a health professional before adding it to your daily practice. And stop doing it if anything hurts when doing it or afterwards “No pain no gain” is a western malapropism.

This Qigong is done with penetrating percussive fingertip tapping, open hand slaps, and softly clasped fists. Hit gently but forcefully, imagining you are penetrating all the way into the marrow of the bones. Never should the skin appear bruised, instead the skin should feel tingly and radiantly alive. Underneath the skin, especially in the fascia, should feel strengthened and full of warm thick qi. Also, your acupuncture points may begin to feel opened and cleansed.  All these positive sensations may last for twelve to twenty-four hours, or possibly longer.

The number of taps and slaps for each individual body part—usually of nine in a “bundle”—is for the beginner. Once you have grown accustomed to the exercise, the number of taps or slaps on any body part may be increased to up to one hundred or more in what I am calling a “bundle,” and the number of bundles may be increased from one to five or more. Yet even only a few taps, slaps, or hits with soft fists can prove beneficial and enjoyable. However it is important not to omit any section of the exercise; in other words, work on all the suggested parts of the body in the order that they are given, and try to do the entire practice every day.

The Warm Up

To build up the Qi (Life Force Energy): Rub your hands together, then stretch and wiggle your fingers. Feel the blood, qi and warmth flow into your hands. Tap your fingertips together. Wiggle your fingers again.

Pretend you are holding a beach ball. Inhale and feel this imaginary ball expand. As you exhale squeeze it back to its original size.  Do this for a few minutes or until you feel your palms and fingertips grow warm—or even better, hot. This is to increase the quantity and quality of your qi as your taps and slaps are sending this healing vitality into the body.

1. The Upper Part of the Head. Lightly pat from the front to back with the fingertips. For the left side do 9 taps; then for the right side do 9 taps. Then repeat this. Avoid hitting the Baihui point, GV-20, at the crown (top) of the head.

2. The Arms. Tap with a soft fist 9 times down each of the four sides of the left arm (inside, outside, upper, lower). Stop when you reach the hand and never tap on or over the fingers. Do the same on the right arm.

3. The Shoulders. With either fingertips, soft fists, or cupped palms, strike the left shoulder with the right hand. Then the right shoulder with the left hand.  Do each side 9 times.

Note: Hit on and around the general vicinity of the GB-21 point. This is said to “disperse liver qi stagnation,” and “dredge excess qi from all the yang channels.” [Professor Jerry Alan Johnson. “Point Tapping Therapy.”]

4. The Upper Back. Tap the upper left back with a right-hand soft fist. Then the upper right back with a left-hand soft fist. Do each side 9 times.  If easier to do, use the right hand on the right side, left hand on the left side.

Note 1: Aim on striking on and around the Bl-15 acupressure point.

This point opens directly to the heart. Here a slapping or soft fist tapping is more easily done by someone else. It may help in reducing emotional problems—here I speak from personal experience, although it wasn’t necessarily an instant fix.

Note 2: Because the upper back can be hard to reach, it may be convenient for you to substitute a tree for your fists by being like a bear in the woods and rubbing, banging and scratching your back up against a tree.  Be careful; wear a thick shirt or a coat, and as with any qigong: use common sense.

5. The Chest. Alternately using the hands, pat the chest downward and upward for a total of 18 times.

6.  The Abdomen and Small of the Back. Strike the left lower side of the abdomen with the right palm as you with a soft left-hand fist strike the small of the back. Do the left side 9 times; the right side 9 times.

7. The Buttocks. Tap or slap the left buttock with the left hand’s fingertips or soft fists or open cupped palm 9 times. Strike on and around the GV-30 point at the dimple on the buttocks. Do the same for the right side.

8. The Legs. Do not do this when standing on both feet. That would bring too much blood (and qi) to the head and also you might fall over. So do this exercise when you seated, or if standing prop your heel up on a support (chair, bench,  low wall, etc.). It’s a good idea to hold onto something with your non-striking hand to maintain your balance. Begin with fingertip tapping down from the thigh to the ankle (never hit the foot) 9 times for each of the four sides of the left leg (inner, back, upper, outer). Then do the same on the right leg.

To Finish

Rub your hands together and brush yourself off—(think “air wash”). Then shake yourself to further rid yourself of any remaining stagnation or bad qi [xie qi].  Then if convenient take a short walk.

Additional Comments. When tapping, slapping or hitting don’t just brutishly bash away on yourself. Use a light but penetration touch sending arrowheads of qi into the body, and then by instantaneously withdrawing your hand the acupoint (or whatever you are working on) seems to open by itself like a flower blooming in the spring. This Tonifies (strengthens by gathering in good qi), and Sedates (disperses bad qi).

Sources

Hu Bin. Keep Fit The Chinese Way. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991. https://www.amazon.com/Keep-Fit-Chinese-Way-Traditional/dp/7119009087

Professor Jerry Alan Johnson. “Point Tapping Therapy.’ Qi Journal, vol. 274; Winter 2017-2018. http://www.qi-journal.com/store.asp?-token.S=qi&ID=3639

Mantak Chia. Bone Marrow Nei Kung. Destiny Books, 2006. https://books.google.com/books?id=Sl0oDwAAQBAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

The author, may be contacted at john.voigt@comcast.net

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The beautiful featured image photo by Manja Benic on Unsplash